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13 Full Size Kingdom Reborn Screenshot Links

Discussion in 'UO Developer Feed' started by UODevTracker, Jan 29, 2007.

  1. UODevTracker

    UODevTracker Guest

  2. TheGrimmOmen

    TheGrimmOmen UO Legend
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  3. TheGrimmOmen

    TheGrimmOmen UO Legend
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    The first thing to know about strokes is why they're there. For those of you who know this just skip a bit, I'll be moving on soon enough. The strokes, or black outlines are are usually (in UO anyway) more of an artifact resulting from the 1 bit alpha. In this scenario, any given pixel in an image is either completely transparent, or its completely opaque. You'll see the black lines most markedly on curved surfaces, but not as much on horizontal and vertical lines (if you do see them in this instance, the odds are good they were put there on purpose for consistency sake). In the case of the monsters, when they are rendered out, the alpha channel is often times aliased, which means that some pixels that were rendered out to be 50% transparent are now 100% opaque and thus creates a dark pixel. All those dark pixels around a creature add up to a dark outline.

    I think the outlines work well for the original client, When resolutions get low, it helps, as Saph pointed out, to differentiate between objects if they have some kind of border. On higher resolutions, the border becomes optional from a design perspective (artistic design, that is.) My personal opinion on the outlines is this: yes, they help the objects stand out, but I think they tend to make them look like they are not connected to the environment. I agree that there is certainly no right or wrong answer to this, it's a matter of preference.

    Good to post again! Well, back to work!

    -Grimm