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OT: Tech Geek Question?

Discussion in 'UO Siege Perilous' started by enigma eb2, Dec 11, 2008.

  1. enigma eb2

    enigma eb2 Sage
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    When linking 2 Pcs thru a router how long should said router last?

    For example Patty and I burn thru routers at the rate of 1 or 2 a year. Is this normal??
     
  2. Skylark SP

    Skylark SP Available Storage: 0
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    Router abusers! :mad:

    Is your router plugged into a battery supplied socket of a UPS? The reason I ask is because voltage fluctuations can kill electronics before their time. Voltage "sags" in particular are very hard on electronics because they have no built-in defense for it. Beyond that it is a matter of product quality. I had a Linksys router that lasted well over 3 years, and another of the same model that bellied up in a year, both were plugged into UPS for most of their lifetime.

    Environmental conditions aside, you should expect most home routers to last 2 - 3 years at the least.

    -Skylark
     
  3. shipwrek

    shipwrek Guest

    I've had my linksys for about 4 years and another before it for about 3. No problems with either (upgraded for wireless.)

    I concur with what Skylark said.. Its probably your power.
     
  4. Patty Pickaxe

    Patty Pickaxe Certifiable
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    The router (which is a Linksys) is plugged into a power strip. We have had several power outages in the past few months. Would that be a contributing factor?
     
  5. Alrich

    Alrich Guest

    my last router lasted over four years before replacing it with an N wireless the beginning of this year.

    Power strip is good, UPS (Uninterruptable power source) is better, though it is esentially the same thing as a strip except it has a battery backup on it.

    Is it overheating though? Make sure its somewhere with some sort of ventillation, if you stick it in a closet or ontop your pc or somewhere where its getting lots of hot air, you may just be burning them out.

    Same if it is in somewhere with high amounts of moisture in the air.

    should be installed somewhere cool and dry if possible, if you have it in a basement or such and moisture gets in there, consider trying a dehumidifier, or get some moisture absorbing salt packet thingys and keep it near the router
     
  6. Patty Pickaxe

    Patty Pickaxe Certifiable
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    I don't *think* it's overheating. It' is under the desk, sitting on top of an old computer tower that we don't use anymore. There's at least 8" of space between the router and the desktop. The desk is pretty wide, so our legs don't take up all the space when we are sitting at the desk. Can dust be a factor? I have a can of air (dust remover), would it help to blast it with that?
     
  7. Skylark SP

    Skylark SP Available Storage: 0
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    It can be...most electronics have some type of built-in circuit breaker for dealing with minor power spikes, and a power strip further insulates against this, but battery power is the only thing that mitigates stress on components due to low voltage situations. If your house lights dim at times, but don't actually go out, then you probably have a lot of short low power situations.

    A UPS is best thought of as a power conditioner.

    The fact that you have had more than one router fail in a suspiciously short time seems to point to an environmental situation. (One router failing can probably be attributed to material defect.) As Alrich mentions, ventilation and humidity are other factors, but if your router is in the same room as your computer I doubt humidity is the culprit - your computers would be far more unhappy with the conditions. After voltage, ventilation is the next most likely suspect. Make sure your router can "breathe" wherever it is located.

    -Skylark

    P.S. on the dust issue - yes, definitely keep it clean. If dust clogs the vents that can cause it to overheat.
     
  8. Spree

    Spree Babbling Loonie
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    My netgear one has worked over 8 years, But today I turned it off because I just got my new fios router 20 meg DL 5 meg up. First post on the new router :thumbup:
     
  9. Alrich

    Alrich Guest

    Yes dust can suffocate the router and it never, ever hurts to air it out once in awhile. Just make sure you use either canned air or a static-free vaccuum... I've seen some people use an air compressor to clean out pcs and such... BAD BAD BAD (they contain moisture and sometimes dirt which when used you are spraying directly onto vital components)

    actually my desktop the room its in picks up a lot of dust and cathair, I always try to air it out atleast once a month
     
  10. Patty Pickaxe

    Patty Pickaxe Certifiable
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    Thanks for the troubleshooting! I will try to "dust" it. I hope it works bc I really do not want to buy *another* router!
     
  11. Pestilence Hemp

    Pestilence Hemp Journeyman
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    Air flow air flow air flow
     
  12. Patty Pickaxe

    Patty Pickaxe Certifiable
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    *UPDATE*

    We figured the router was fried so I went out and bought another one. We set it up, even set it up on top of the desk so it could get better airflow. I *still* can't connect to the internet. :yell: We are thinking the ether net card in my computer is fried. Logical assumption?
     
  13. Skylark SP

    Skylark SP Available Storage: 0
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    I am guessing that Enigma's computer is working fine with the new router?

    If so, it could be a problem with the adapter in your computer OR it could just be a software setting problem.

    First things to try...with your computer connected to the router, and the router connected to the cable modem in your "normal" setup:

    Open command prompt. (Click Start --> Run, Type cmd in the Run box, and press Enter)

    At the command prompt type:

    ipconfig /all, then press Enter.

    Check to see if in the details that it lists for your Ethernet adapter that the wire is connected to, it says DHCP enabled: Yes. If it gives an address that begins with 169...it means it is not communicating with the DHCP server on either the router or your cable modem to get a valid IP address. If however you get an IP address reported back that starts with something other than 169, do this:

    Type: ipconfig /release (press Enter)

    Then: ipconfig /renew (press Enter)

    Type: ipconfig /flushdns (press Enter)

    Then try connecting to the Internet.

    -Skylark
     
  14. enigma eb2

    enigma eb2 Sage
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    Yes my PC is just fine on the router and when we did your research it does say 169. so what does that mean is wrong and how to we fix it from there?
     
  15. Pestilence Hemp

    Pestilence Hemp Journeyman
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    I would check hardware first. make sure your ethernet card is working. then go onto the settings.
     
  16. Skylark SP

    Skylark SP Available Storage: 0
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    It means that the adapter is not "talking" to the DHCP server component of the router.

    Go into the TCP/IP properties of the adapter, and make sure it is set up to use DHCP. To do this, open your Network Connections, and right click on the adapter in question and choose Properties. Then scroll down to Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) settings and click on that to highlight it, then click on the Properties button.

    [​IMG]

    You want it to be set up like this:

    [​IMG]

    -Skylark
     
  17. Skylark SP

    Skylark SP Available Storage: 0
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    If the card is set to use DHCP, and it still does not work, as a last thing, shut down everything on the network, including the cable modem, then power them back up in this order:

    Cable modem
    Router
    Patty's PC

    If she still can't connect, then it sounds like the card may be flaking out, and you have already ruled out something like a bad cable or loose connector on the cable from her computer to the router, then it sounds like it is probably a bad Ethernet card.

    -Skylark
     
  18. Skylark SP

    Skylark SP Available Storage: 0
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    So what happened? Did you get it working?

    -Skylark
     
  19. Patty Pickaxe

    Patty Pickaxe Certifiable
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    We finally got it working. Thanks again for all the help.