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UO Account Security: Tips, Information, and Discussions

Discussion in 'UHall' started by Guest, Mar 9, 2006.

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  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    <font color="red">Ways to protect your UO Account</font>
    1. Use a Strong Password.
      8 to 16 characters long consisting of Uppercase, Lowercase, and Numbers.
      * (Example: feq62PLe826k - the maximum number a password is checked for when signing into the game is 16 characters)
      * Use a password checker to make sure you have a 'strong password'. Microsoft's checker is probably the safest. That can be found Here.
    2. Change your Passwords regularly.
      * I suggest changing your passwords once a Month.
    3. Tips for keeping your password secure:
      * Never tell your password to anyone (this includes significant others, roommates, parrots, etc.).
      * Never write your password down.
      * Never send your password by email.
      * Periodically test your current password and change it to a new one.
    4. Use a private E-Mail Address.
      * Do not use this email address at ANY other web sites.
      * Do not give it out to Anyone.
      * Use it ONLY for Ultima Online.
    5. Protect your E-Mail Account too.
      * Use a Strong Password too!
    6. Protect your Account Name.
      * Do not give your Account Name to Anyone except to EA Officials!
    7. Use Caution Entering your Password at Web Sites!
      * Do not enter your Account Name at any site other that UO.com's site.
      * When you go to your Account Management or to the UO Game Code Store, go there Directly and not through any external links in emails or other web sites.
    8. Do not give your Password Out.
      * No one at EA will ask your for your Password in E-Mails, PMs, or any other fashion except for by Phone, and then only when You call them.
    9. Use a Strong Account Name.
      * When creating a New Account, for your Username, use a combination of Letters and Numbers.
    10. Be Cautions when Creating Account and Character Names!
      * Do not use your Real Name as Character Names, Account Names, and do not use your Account Name as Character Names or Account Names at any other Web Sites.
    11. Firewall &amp; Anti-Virus helps to keep you Safe!
      * Keep your Firewall &amp; Anti-Virus Software Up-To-Date!
      Windows Firewall is NOT enough!
      * If you cannot afford another firewall, go download ZoneAlarm's free Firewall! www.zonealarm.com.
      * If you cannot afford an Anti-Virus Software, go download AVG's Free Anti-Virus: www.grisoft.com.
    12. Do regular Virus Scans!
      * If you think your infected, do NOT enter your password or account name until you are sure you have eliminated the Virus(es)
    13. 3rd-Party Programs.
      * Do not run any 3rd-Party Programs that are not approved. You never know what could be built into said program!
      Check Here for EA's list of Approved 3rd Party Applications./li]


    * If you have a weak password, change it!
    * If you use your same email address for UO on other web sites, get a new Email Address and change it with UO in your Account Manager.
    * If you have characters named after your Account Name or Real Name, soulstone their skills and delete them, or buy a Name Change Code if you can afford it.


    Please post any other suggestions you have to add to this list and I will update it. As well as add anything else I can think of later on.

    <font color="red">My Request to EA:</font> Allow us to call you guys/gals up and change our Account Names if we have a weak account name or have been compromised in the past. Please!

    <font color="darkblue">This list has been updated on the date &amp; time of the Edit Timestamp. Thanks to everyone who have made and will make suggestions to add to this! Knowledge is the BEST protection!</font>


    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


    Ghost_Writer wrote the following precaution:<blockquote><hr>

    There has been a recent rise in blatant attempts to gain access to UO accounts. Sites are being put up specifically to target the UO player base such as the Kingdom-Reborn download site which had a Trojan, the spoof site of uoforum dot net which was intended to spoof a legit fan site uoforums.com, and this most recent uotrading site which several people are complaining of being hacked after recently signing up for.

    This goes beyond the normal "protect yourself on the internet" since we are specific targets and extra effort is being put into ways to trick specifically UO players.

    Do not use sites that are not well known and trusted. And never use your UO information or even the same email account you use for UO, on another site.

    This post will be left as a sticky to warn everyone, however I am locking it to prevent any discussions or arguments about how people should know better. Obviously not all do so we have a responsibility as a community to try to warn them.

    If you have information of a specific site that you think justifies a specific warning please PM me with the information and I will check it out and add it to this thread if warranted.

    Thank you,
    Ghost

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Please everyone, do NOT trust any site claiming to be Ultima Online that is not *.ea.com - *.uo.com - *.uoherald.com - *.uogamecodes.com


    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


    User Sorcon wrote the following:
    <blockquote><hr>

    Sorcon

    Date: 09/06/07 10:27 PM -- Subject: Scammers are At it again w/ "Unmentionable"<blockquote><hr>

    Hey, Scammers are once again trying the "Unmentionable" program script to make you throw your gear on the ground at your feet.

    They just hit a friend of mine on Legends. Granted, he should have never ran the "unmentionable" program, but someone posed as one of his closest friends and guildmates, told him to DL it and he did... Then fed him the script that made him throw his stuff on the ground.

    Of course he bears fault in this for the "Unmentionable" program, but just a warning so that it is fresh in people's minds.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Furthermore, a user commented on why we cannot allow this program to be named: <blockquote><hr>

    "i think its lame we cant say it, but it clearly says if the program isn't on the approved list, you cant use it."

    [/ QUOTE ]Yes, I do agree to some extent. However, we feel it is best to not help spread the word of illegal program names so fresh players, who may not know programs are illegal, cannot easily locate them through our site.

    We want to play no part in players finding and using such programs through our site.

    To Echo the last words in the above statement: "but it clearly says if the program isnt on the approved list, you cant use it."

    You may find that list of Approved Programs, HERE


    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


    The following was suggested by user Highball:<blockquote><hr>

    Hi there ...

    There's a great deal going on about accounts being hacked.

    One way to prevent this is having different passwords related to different sites.

    Then some will ask and have in mind: What if i forget a password? Some have experienced and some use the same password.

    If you forget a password, well there are ways around that nowadays since you can retreive a new.

    If you on the other hand use the same password no matter where you enter - you really ask for trouble.

    Different passwords ... that's another way to deal with the hacks and no it's not at all hard to remember ...

    Here's the tool:

    1. You split up all the places where you need to enter a password into two groups:
    <font color="red"> Economically related (bank accounts and such - and where you i.e. use a credit card - net business and such) </font>
    <font color="green"> All other places (Like stratics forum) </font>

    2. For each group you pick two items in your home that you are close related to. I.e.:
    Curtain
    Table

    3. You split up the two groups (mentioned in #1) into three groups after increase in security. I.e.
    <font color="#666666"> A. Normal sites - no added letters </font>
    <font color="blue"> B. Higher security needed - here you add a BIG letter in front and after the basic password itself, like A and O ... or i.e. a Q and a W - two letters that you easily can remember where they are placed on your keyboard </font>
    <font color="purple"> C. Highest security needed - here you add a number in front of the BIG letter + basic password + BIG letter. I.e. 1 and 2 or 9 and 0 (zero). </font>

    4. You will now be able to have six diff groups of securities from the basic to the highest level of safety.

    5. Examples:

    Economically related ...

    Level 1: <font color="red">curtain</font> (IF you want to increase security make the first letter a BIG letter like <font color="red">Curtain</font>

    Level 2: <font color="blue">A</font><font color="red">Curtain</font><font color="blue">S</font>

    Level 3: <font color="purple">5</font><font color="blue">A</font><font color="red">Curtain</font><font color="blue">S</font><font color="purple">6</font>

    All other ... do NOT use the same letters or numbers as in econ. relations

    Level 1: <font color="green">table</font> or <font color="green">Table</font>

    Level 2: <font color="blue">Q</font><font color="green">Table</font><font color="blue">W</font>

    Level 3: <font color="purple">1</font><font color="blue">Q</font><font color="green">Table</font><font color="blue">W</font><font color="purple">2</font>

    6. It's quite easy actually: Pick two words related to two items you're fond of. Then pick 2 x 2 letters placed easily for you on the keyboard and pick 2x2 numbers likewise.

    7. You will find that your passwords can be remembered this way and you will have six diff levels of security.

    8. And FINAL ... do NOT use my examples here in the manual.

    9. Good luck and you should now have made it not only harder, but merely impossible for hackers to make trial attempts of your password - and to make it even more safer - <font color="red">behave on the net</font>:

    10. To make it safer for you i'll give you a couple of advices concerning how to behave safer related to the net:

    I. Don't ever open an e-mail from a sender you haven't in your addressbook already (unless it's a sender you know) &gt;&gt;&gt; Do NOT read the e-mail, do NOT open it - DELETE the e-mail and INSTANTLY !!!

    II. Don't ever open attachments you don't know of - EVEN when in an e-mail from somebody you know of !!! Two methods: DELETE the e-mail instantly - and do NOT open neither the e-mail nor the attachment / or write the sender and ask for confirmation that the person deliberately attached something - and what it is - there could be an attachment that the person not added.
    One way of a forewarned attachment could be that you make a deal with people you get attachments from ... you tell the person to write in the e-mail: *I have attached # of attachments* - where # is the actual and precise number of attachments, the * in front and after is a sign of a personal attachment - best if the person writes the names of the attachments themselves. This way you can see if the mail and the attachments differ !

    III. Be very cautious about to whom you give out your e-mail / your ICQ / your msn / your creditcard information - and do NOT in ANY way give out a password (for NO reason !!!) - a person wanting close information has bad intentions - the only person that needs information about your password is YOU.

    IV. If you receive requests from somebody on the net that would like to be added to your ICQ, MSN or otherwise - DENY. Though - if a business has been set up in UO and you agree to correspond through ICQ, MSN etc. then read the personal information about that person. If you don't find any kind of info that relates to the person you expect to make a deal with - then write a message to that person (requesting adding) and request information about where you met or why the add request has been received. If the reply doesn't match the information you have already on the person - DENY access and BLOCK the person.
    It's better to loose a good UO deal than to loose your bank account or your UO account !

    V. <font color="red">NEVER be curious about something you have received that you haven't asked for - and no ... you will NOT be the lucky one that won in a 10 mill. lottery without having paid for a ticket !!!</font>
    People don't get anything for free nowadays !

    Good luck.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    You may read the corresponding thread in relation to this that has some replies and more information, Here.
     
  2. Ithilkir

    Ithilkir Guest

  3. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Very good suggestion, except 12 character passwords are overkill, 8 is more than enough. Bruteforcing a password at 8 or above would take decades, and if they have a logger on your system, then it doesn't matter if your password is 8, 12 or 200.
     
  4. good stuff, if more people followed this, less account hackings would happen.
     
  5. Excellent post.. remember..account security STARTS with you (the account holder). Almost in EVERY case of an account getting hacked it is due to a security lapse outside the control of EA.

    Lord_Chaos - If the password is 17 characters long will it then be safe since you didnt list it?? [​IMG]

    ***Goes and changes his password to wordpass***
     
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest

    LOL, no just any password beyond 8 characters is pretty pointless, just keep it a random jumble of letters and numbers.
     
  7. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Only the first 16 are checked against. Anything after that is worthless. Try it some time create a 20 char password and enter only the first 16. The game will let you play.
     
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Thanks for the tips, I have updatd this list!
     
  9. Garaba

    Garaba Guest

    Also,

    Do not run any 3rd party program that is not approved. You never know what could be built into said program.
     
  10. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Thanks added! [​IMG]
     
  11. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Hi Orvago,
    <blockquote><hr>

    <font color="red">Ways to protect your UO Account</font>
    Great idea for a post. Glad to see this stickied up at the top of the board.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    Aye, every user should have two email addresses... one for public use and one for private use. Public for blogs, family &amp; friends, forums, sites, etc.; private for banking, e-commerce (Amazon, eBay, UO, etc.), financial transactions, etc. Yes, even having one specificly for UO couldn't hurt.

    Strong passwords are key. I agree, longer passwords are better. Some posters may feel that passwords longer than 8 characters is overkill, and that may be the case on the UO login server (would to see evidence if that is the case though), however that is NOT the case with most email servers... most email servers will handle from 3 to 32 chars nowadays, depends very much on the server OS and mail server software being run.

    Today modern password managers are recommended in most IT enviroments. They are convienent, easy to use, encrypted, and safe. They can not only store and retrieve passwords, but also encrypt them, generate safe ones, and manage the forms/sites they are used with. Like... Account Logon, Password Profiler, RoboForm and others.

    Also some mail servers allow the use of special characters in passwords, these can greatly increase the complexity of the passwords in use on that system. If this is supported, it is worth using.

    Another factor to consider are the email servers themselves. Newer web mail services tend to be more secure than older web mail services, however POP3 email servers tend to be more secure than web mail services... not only because of infrastruture differences, but more importantly because the big web services (AOL, HotMail, MSN, Yahoo!, etc.) tend to be under attack more because of the large number of users, and hacking tools available for them.

    Most ISPs provide their users with some form of POP3 email accounts in addition to web mail. Ideally it's most secure to use a POP3 account with a traditional email client (or with a web interface gateway into that POP3 account). Which brings us to client applications.

    Keep current on applications is important too. If you insist on using Internet Explorer and/or Outlook Express... run Windows Update (and Office Update if you are using MS Office), and download &amp; install those high priority (aka critical) and optional updates. Consider using newer alternative apps... Firefox or Opera (for web browsing; Maxthon is not a browser, its an add-on for IE... IE is still IE no matter how much lipstick you put on it); and Eudora® 7, Mozilla Thunderbird, Microsoft Outlook 2003 or greater, or Opera Mail (for email clients). Outlook Express is the single most insecure component of the Windows enviroment... much more insecure than either IE or Windows itself.

    I have to say this, because so many of my clients just don't get it... Outlook Express and Outlook are two different programs. Stop using OE.

    In addition to AVG for anti virus, there is also Avira's AntiVir, Alwil's avast! and many others. Also in the malware/spyware realm, there is... Ad-Aware SE Personal, Ewido, F-Secure BlackLight Rootkit Scanner, and of course Spybot - Search &amp; Destroy.

    A caveat about EA's list of Approved 3rd Party Applications. This list has not changed since the discontinuation of the UO Pro program many years ago. There is no guarantee that the programs on the list is still safe (likely they still are, just stating the possibility for change). Because of the discontinuation of UO Pro and the length of time since then... users should seek the advice of the community and use their own best judgement.

    Also there are new UO app tools/utilities known to be as safe as the UO Pro apps could be today... that are not on the list. Discounting all UO related 3rd party apps not already on the list since the list is no longer up to date, and assuming that the apps on the still are still guaranteed safe... is inaccurate.

    To wrap this up... thanks for the info and topic. This is important stuff. [​IMG]
     
  12. Guest

    Guest Guest

    While some of the tips posted are good, some are overrated.

    <blockquote><hr>


    Use a Strong Password.
    8 to 16 characters long consisting of Uppercase, Lowercase, and Numbers.
    (Example: feq62PLe826k - the maximun number a password is checked for when signing into the game is 16 characters)
    Use a password checker to make sure you have a 'strong password'. Microsoft's checker is probably the safest. That can be found
    Here.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    1) OSI most likely has some type of method in place to counter brute force attacks against accounts. At least, one would hope that if someone tries to login on an account 100 times with 100 different passwords they would be blocked. In any event, it would take a long time to randomly guess a password unless you picked one of the super common ones (IE: password or your account name).

    2) It doesn't matter how strong your password is once someone has it, which is the method used 99.99999% of the time in this case. It is basically a waste of time to make a password like this hfH72mkv824KsbfHDB which could take someone 30 seconds a time to type in.

    The bottom line is: Choose a password of reasonable length which is not a common word. For example: straticsuo or maybe Google1997.
    <blockquote><hr>


    Change your Passwords regularily.
    I suggest changing your passwords once a Month.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    If someone has your password it doesn't matter how often you change it. They will probably hack into your account unless you are incredibly lucky to change it right after they hack it.

    The only time I change passwords (in general) is when I suspect they have been compromised or I loned someone an account and they no longer need access. That is one of the most common ways people get hacked, they give someone account access and never change their password. So months or years later that person comes back and steals from them.

    So if the only time you use your UO password is on the account management site or to login to UO, then changing it weekly/monthly/everytime you logout isn't going to do much to increase your security.

    <blockquote><hr>

    Use a private E-Mail Address.
    Do not use this email address at ANY other web sites.
    Do not give it out to Anyone.
    Use it ONLY for Ultima Online.[*]Protect your E-Mail Account too.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    I would only add to that is don't use an ISP email. If someone gets your information it is quite easy from them to contact your ISP and try to trick a clueless CSR into giving them your password (which is probably stored in plain text). Using Yahoo or Gmail is a much better alternative because they won't give you your account back for nothing. If you forget it and your security question answer, say goodbye to that email account.
     
  13. So, Ya'll still emailing PW's?
     
  14. Heres a couple of other sites that may help , some are real detailed..

    This site is real informative and sometimes has info before major anti virus / spyware / firewall companies ( even microsoft) , even know about them...

    http://isc.sans.org/

    ---------------------

    http://www.jlathamsite.com/dslr/suspectports.htm


    <blockquote><hr>

    This list was built from several sources from various Internet Security oriented sites. It is not a complete list, but does list over 400 ports that are known to be used by various Trojans. The table is oriented toward attacks of Windows based systems.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    -----------------------------------------------

    Nortons Virus List : Updates ALOT

    http://securityresponse.symantec.com/avcenter/vinfodb.html

    --------------------------------------
    Great Spyware Checker Site:

    http://www.spywareguide.com/index.php

    -----------------------------------------
    Is your Anti-Spyware Program legit????

    http://www.spywarewarrior.com/rogue_anti-spyware.htm

    -------------------------------------------

    Got Emails , Dont Trust them , Look Here: Registration on this site allows you to send in emails

    http://www.dslreports.com/phishtrack


    Icq Security:

    http://www.icq.com/support/security/



    EA Support number: 1-866-543-5435
     
  15. kimberlyER

    kimberlyER Guest

    Here is a new one to me.... I was hacked today from registering on a "tradeforum". Apparently they got my ip address and hacked into my pc through a firewall. I have no idea hoe they managed this, since there is no keylogger or virus involved. The even got into accounts that i have not logged into for days. I visited this site and was hacked by the guy that gave me the address to visit within 2 hours. He was in my keep and had already taken it. Any ideas how he did that one?
     
  16. kimberlyER

    kimberlyER Guest

    Ohh, I forgot to add that the user name and pass I created on this forum site was VERY far from any user/pass on my accounts and the email address was also very far from any UO accounts. I have done all the virus and keylogger searches but I am still afraid to re-activate my accounts until I know how this was done since he may still be able to get into my pc? Any help on this topic will be greatly appreciated =) TY
     
  17. I'd run multi scans , Call EA , Maybe post this info on UOtech forum see if anyone can help ,once your 100% sure your ok , change passwords ..
     
  18. Darkholme

    Darkholme Grand Inquisitor
    Stratics Veteran

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2004
    Messages:
    4,404
    Likes Received:
    0
    *slides out of the shadows*

    Two things... firstly, changing your password on a regular basis is a worthless and fairly common piece of bad advice for online security. This ain't 1982, if a hacker gets your password he's using it and gone before you even know it. The odds of you changing your password between the hacker getting it and the hacker using it are virtually nil. Pointless... and anyone truly versed in internet security will agree with me.

    Secondly, don't use EAs password retrieval system whatever you do. Again, this ain't 1982, just write your passwords down, and if you're feeling cheeky, put the list somewhere safe like... in a safe. They're safer written down on real piece of paper and hidden than they are on your PC somewhere. Duh, you're trying to protect your sensitive information, like passwords from hackers so the last place you want your passwords is on your PC... and they're certainly safer than using EAs password retieval system.

    Just for a poop and a smile I used EAs password retrieval system just now, after having had my accounts closed and not paying for UO for a year and low and behold they are still sending your password in an unsecure, unencrypted email.

    *slides back into the shadows*
     
  19. Guest

    Guest Guest

    The forgotten password mail hack is using the security flaws in the MTS and X4.11 features of SMTP protocol that place the mail in X4.11 directory structures in plain text.

    There is nothing you can do on the client side to protect yourself. The exploit is not using your client at all, so antivirus and browser settings are useless.

    Strong passwords are useless.

    Statics rules do not allow posting of the details of the exploit, however to perform the exploit the person must have administrative access to either a POP3 or MTS server that the mail transfers through.

    If you receive mails asking for your password do the following:

    Change your UO password, do this by typing UO.com in your browser, do not click on the link in the mail.

    Once your password is changed, you will get a second mail. (The hacker now has two pieces of information, a mail with your account name, and one with your password. The attacker knows they are the same because of the e-mail address being the same)
    Now change your mail address. You will get a confirmation mail again, however the hacker is left blind since the user name and password mails are for a changed password, and all mails for the user name are now going to a new mail address.

    Remember the hacker is using automation and data mining to plow through hundreds of thousands of mails to find these passwords and account access mails, they do not have time to do this by hand, and so changing your mail address as the last step is the critical piece.

    The automated script hits the EA site with random names asking for passwords. The EA server responds with the forgotten password mail. The attacker does not care if the EA server responded with a valid page, or invalid account name page, however to save time with the script, they should log the valid hits since they will need to run this scripts a second time for this to work.

    If you do not change your password, the attacker has only two pieces of information; your password and your mail address. They do not have your account name since they have no way to know what mail address EA sent the forgotten password mail for. The attacker is hitting the EA server thousands of times; they cannot correlate the hit time with the mail sent by EA. At this point the hacker still needs more information.

    When you change your password, you give the attacker the third piece of information. The attacker now has two mails. One with your password (Old) and one with your account name. They also have your e-mail address. The e-mail address is the key. The attacker runs the script again, this time the attacker is looking for only two pieces of information. The password and the e-mail address. Once they get the mail, they look in the database they built using the X4.11 exploit and they correlate the password with the account name by tying the two together by the common mail address. The attacker now has your current password, and your account name. And they are on a timer to work quickly to clean your account before you check your mail and change your password again.

    If your thinking…something’s is missing…it is, I did not post the details of the X4.11 exploit, other then to state that you have to be an Admin on a POP3 or MTS server that the mail is transiting to make this work. If you can write in any UNIX scripting language, this part is a no brainier.

    If your thinking..aha, I just wont change my password! That will mean they never get the third piece of information! Bad idea. You may have already had a mail sent with that information that the attacker already has, or you may do so in the future without remembering that you have already given away the first two pieces of information.
     
  20. Crunch VmP

    Crunch VmP Guest

    Recently my account was stripped as well. I have gotten various e-mails even as recent as early this morning.

    R.I.P. Inquisitor's Resolution

    What can I do to make this account secure again?

    I changed my e-mail password, and my account password twice today.

    Also, my account name is only four letters, and its sort of a word, so like, if this guy is using an account scanning script, its possible that he goes over my account name every time he starts it back up, right?
     
  21. Guest

    Guest Guest

    We need a way to change our account names.

    Also, the web "Lost Password Feature" needs changed to have/require all of the following:

    1) Email on the Account
    2) Account Name
    3) Add a Graphic to prevent people from using it endlessly to fish for stuff.
    4) Make it only allow 3 tries within a 24 hour period.
    5) When it returns with an error, do not state which field is incorrect!!
    6) If a user cannot remember their account name and email, have them call Support!!
     
  22. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Hail: There is always a loophole. The Loophole here is that you have only 30 days to report your account as being hacked. So if you get sent overseas, with no internet access, "like i was", and return, and can not log in as, "Name or password is not correct" message come up, BY BY ACCOUNTS.

    When you send the e mail, and provide all the information, it of course is NOT current. So you get a reply back saying, "Account information is NOT what is on file, E Mail is not correct, and so on. OF COURSE IT IS NOT CORRECT IF IT WAS STOLEN, and Changed!

    No one even bothered to check the information from the dates i requested, "as it was more than 30 days ago". Like i said, this would only affect a few people, but it is easily correctable, but since it takes a little effort, a few people are not worth it.
     
  23. google also offers up some tips for keeping passwords secure

    <blockquote><hr>

    Tips for keeping your password secure:

    * Never tell your password to anyone (this includes significant others, roommates, parrots, etc.).
    * Never write your password down.
    * Never send your password by email.
    * Periodically test your current password and change it to a new one.


    [/ QUOTE ]

    i lol'ed but obviously it is a legitimate consideration
     
  24. Lord_Order

    Lord_Order Guest

    <blockquote><hr>

    Very good suggestion, except 12 character passwords are overkill, 8 is more than enough. Bruteforcing a password at 8 or above would take decades, and if they have a logger on your system, then it doesn't matter if your password is 8, 12 or 200.

    [/ QUOTE ]


    Good to know. Thanks for the heads up.
     
  25. Tevvin

    Tevvin Guest

    All good info, but reality is what it is. The strength of your password is irrelavent.
    And once they get your account name and password, you have a matter of hours before everything you have is gone. And they don't just steal everything you have on your account, they delete all your characters as well. The only way to retrieve your account is over the phone with the credit card that pays the bill handy.
    And from experience I can tell you that EA will help get your account back, but nothing you had on it, items, characters, or houses. You'd think they log the ip of the accused hackers and eventually block them from EA servers after several complaints, yet I've seen no evidence of this. And no, they won't give you the ip numbers that accessed the accounts, I asked. It seems to be a privacy issue, even though it's my account, and only my ip should show up, so much for my privacy.
     
  26. Guest

    Guest Guest

    The following was suggested by user Highball:<blockquote><hr>

    Hi there ...

    There's a great deal going on about accounts being hacked.

    One way to prevent this is having different passwords related to different sites.

    Then some will ask and have in mind: What if i forget a password? Some have experienced and some use the same password.

    If you forget a password, well there are ways around that nowadays since you can retreive a new.

    If you on the other hand use the same password no matter where you enter - you really ask for trouble.

    Different passwords ... that's another way to deal with the hacks and no it's not at all hard to remember ...

    Here's the tool:

    1. You split up all the places where you need to enter a password into two groups:
    <font color="red"> Economically related (bank accounts and such - and where you i.e. use a credit card - net business and such) </font>
    <font color="green"> All other places (Like stratics forum) </font>

    2. For each group you pick two items in your home that you are close related to. I.e.:
    Curtain
    Table

    3. You split up the two groups (mentioned in #1) into three groups after increase in security. I.e.
    <font color="#666666"> A. Normal sites - no added letters </font>
    <font color="blue"> B. Higher security needed - here you add a BIG letter in front and after the basic password itself, like A and O ... or i.e. a Q and a W - two letters that you easily can remember where they are placed on your keyboard </font>
    <font color="purple"> C. Highest security needed - here you add a number in front of the BIG letter + basic password + BIG letter. I.e. 1 and 2 or 9 and 0 (zero). </font>

    4. You will now be able to have six diff groups of securities from the basic to the highest level of safety.

    5. Examples:

    Economically related ...

    Level 1: <font color="red">curtain</font> (IF you want to increase security make the first letter a BIG letter like <font color="red">Curtain</font>

    Level 2: <font color="blue">A</font><font color="red">Curtain</font><font color="blue">S</font>

    Level 3: <font color="purple">5</font><font color="blue">A</font><font color="red">Curtain</font><font color="blue">S</font><font color="purple">6</font>

    All other ... do NOT use the same letters or numbers as in econ. relations

    Level 1: <font color="green">table</font> or <font color="green">Table</font>

    Level 2: <font color="blue">Q</font><font color="green">Table</font><font color="blue">W</font>

    Level 3: <font color="purple">1</font><font color="blue">Q</font><font color="green">Table</font><font color="blue">W</font><font color="purple">2</font>

    6. It's quite easy actually: Pick two words related to two items you're fond of. Then pick 2 x 2 letters placed easily for you on the keyboard and pick 2x2 numbers likewise.

    7. You will find that your passwords can be remembered this way and you will have six diff levels of security.

    8. And FINAL ... do NOT use my examples here in the manual.

    9. Good luck and you should now have made it not only harder, but merely impossible for hackers to make trial attempts of your password - and to make it even more safer - <font color="red">behave on the net</font>:

    10. To make it safer for you i'll give you a couple of advices concerning how to behave safer related to the net:

    I. Don't ever open an e-mail from a sender you haven't in your addressbook already (unless it's a sender you know) &gt;&gt;&gt; Do NOT read the e-mail, do NOT open it - DELETE the e-mail and INSTANTLY !!!

    II. Don't ever open attachments you don't know of - EVEN when in an e-mail from somebody you know of !!! Two methods: DELETE the e-mail instantly - and do NOT open neither the e-mail nor the attachment / or write the sender and ask for confirmation that the person deliberately attached something - and what it is - there could be an attachment that the person not added.
    One way of a forewarned attachment could be that you make a deal with people you get attachments from ... you tell the person to write in the e-mail: *I have attached # of attachments* - where # is the actual and precise number of attachments, the * in front and after is a sign of a personal attachment - best if the person writes the names of the attachments themselves. This way you can see if the mail and the attachments differ !

    III. Be very cautious about to whom you give out your e-mail / your ICQ / your msn / your creditcard information - and do NOT in ANY way give out a password (for NO reason !!!) - a person wanting close information has bad intentions - the only person that needs information about your password is YOU.

    IV. If you receive requests from somebody on the net that would like to be added to your ICQ, MSN or otherwise - DENY. Though - if a business has been set up in UO and you agree to correspond through ICQ, MSN etc. then read the personal information about that person. If you don't find any kind of info that relates to the person you expect to make a deal with - then write a message to that person (requesting adding) and request information about where you met or why the add request has been received. If the reply doesn't match the information you have already on the person - DENY access and BLOCK the person.
    It's better to loose a good UO deal than to loose your bank account or your UO account !

    V. <font color="red">NEVER be curious about something you have received that you haven't asked for - and no ... you will NOT be the lucky one that won in a 10 mill. lottery without having paid for a ticket !!!</font>
    People don't get anything for free nowadays !

    Good luck.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    You may read the corresponding thread in relation to this that has some replies and more information, Here.

    Edit: meant to edit it in the OP, done now, leaving this reply though incase anyone wants to directly reply to this part of the topic.
     
  27. Highball

    Highball Guest

    Great thinking. People should really have some tools now. I have never had an account hacked. I have had port scan attacks as well as attempts to make me open e-mail attachments innocent or suspiscious, but they have failed.

    I have enough empathy to feel how it must be to have a several year account hacked: Items gone, characters deleted etc.

    It would make me furious, but helpless. The only hope could be that UO have a log on the IP intrusion addresses and would give them to the owner of the account.

    I have on two occasions where i received attached malware unwanted, mailed a report and transmission properties to our Internet security police.

    They wrote that they would journal the mail and start an investigation, so somebody must have been in trouble.

    If UO can give the intrusion IP's to the owner - then maybe the attempts would fade out a bit. Who knows.

    Thx anyway for adding my post to your own tools.
     
  28. Highball

    Highball Guest

    Sit down ... the following surprised even me.

    In the middle of UO gaming i suddenly had a firewall warning about an snmp.exe file that wanted to receive incoming transmission signals.

    To my awareness i have no applications that are clearly related to this exe file.

    I clicked my firewall and blocked access completely and permanently. This way i can see if an application stops from running and this way is related to the exe file in question.

    So far so good.

    I stopped gaming, closed UO and seeked info about this file on google. I had several links and found one that claimed was a microsoft certified partner: The site was uniblue. Before i clicked the link to uniblue i opened a microsoft.com page and entered uniblue in their search field.
    Right o' - they mentioned uniblue and had links to some of their softwares.

    Okay - even with the knowledge that innocent sites can be infected with uploading malware, i clicked into the uniblue pages to read about the snmp.exe file.

    I found the necessary info and checked further if the file could be infected itself with malware (probably most microsoft files can be infected - they are a security joke !).
    Well, they WERE certified by microsoft (confirmed by microsoft themselves), so i thought about a freescan in my registry and some exe files.

    It CAN be a good idea, but on behalf of the following experience i will strongly suggest that you never let an external scan your computer - EVEN when microsoft certified !

    What happened was further ... I clicked on the free scan button and recieved a system message if i wanted to install a necessary file on my computer so they could scan. NO WAY !!!

    I annihilated the request and the site in a short instant.

    (I have an xcellent firewall and two scanners installed on my computer - so i am actually quite content about my protection.
    I can't though prevent some cookies from being downloaded to my computer).

    After cancelling the install request (a couple of hours ago) i went into stratics forum to check up on posts and replies.

    I found out that my password tool was linked to Orvago's initial post.

    In the meantime some magickz must have happened since when i closed stratics i opened my outlook to retreive e-mails.

    YIKES and W-T-Heck ... (i had my spamfilter filtering incoming e-mails).

    ... Great was my surprise when i saw an e-mail from ... (yes you guessed right) UNIBLUE which spam offered me products and services !!!!!!!!!!
    It is NOT a coincidence.

    I did NOT give them ANY kind of information. I visited their site and cancelled a request - and EVEN despite that they retreived my private e-mail address to my outlook express - probably through a cookie placed on my harddisk.

    **A SPECIAL OFFER FROM REGNOW AND UNIBLUE** said the subject in the received e-mail.

    It could be that they spammed me through my visit on the microsoft partner site, but i doubt it.

    Experienced and wiser ... when even official sites and microsoft certified related sites can retreive your e-mail this way ... no WONDER it is easy to lure people into opening an e-mail with malware.

    The site (uniblue) is permabanned and blocked from spamming.

    So my newly gained surprise experience can only make me state in CAPS: &gt;&gt;&gt; When official sites can retreive your personal information this easy (I am aware of that microsoft has legal rights to gain system info from your computer) - then be absolutely certain that more obscure/sinister/borderline sites can do the same and will profit from the possibility.

    I am not certain about how the law, concerning spam and retreiving personal info, is in USA - but it is certainly illegal here in Denmark.

    Be careful out there ... the culprits will succeed the more you help them: Make it harder - even if it feels unnecessarily inconvenient. Being lazy or taking the issue lightly can cost you.

    Just wanted to share an experience to back up this thread by Orvago.
     
  29. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Heya, thanks for sharing your experiences. I just wanted to touch on "Uniblue" - http://www.liutilities.com/ - they are a company that has utilities for Security, Libraries, Backups, and Optimizations and are a Microsoft Trusted Partner.

    I get emails from them also, but only because I gave them my email address when I signed up for some trial offers on their products. Have you by any chance done the same?


    <blockquote><hr>

    The process called snmp.exe is used by Windows applications when communicating with network devices using SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol). SNMP is used to perform remote administration of network hardware such as Routers and Hubs. Snmp.exe is required for your system to remain stable, you should not terminate this process.

    snmp.exe is flagged as a system process and does not appear to be a security risk. However, removing Snmp Agent may adversly impact your system.

    The Process Server database currently registers snmp.exe to Microsoft.

    This is part of Microsoft Windows.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    Link: http://www.auditmypc.com/process/snmp.asp


    <blockquote><hr>

    Snmp.exe
    SNMP agent service. A master (proxy) agent. Accepts manager program requests and forwards the requests to the appropriate extension-subagent DLL for processing.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    Link: http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/windows2000serv/reskit/cnet/cneb_snp_jafp.mspx?mfr=true
     
  30. Highball

    Highball Guest

    One could be tempted to believe that i gave them my e-mail address, but no.

    The process was as i described:

    Clicked on a freescan button, and canceled when asked if i wanted to install software.

    I think the problem lies in the fact - and is also enhancing probability of being spammed - that we receive cookies. Some cookies are small pictures (cameo's), some are otherwise.
    Some cookies are mail related, like C:/documents and settings/[name]/cookies

    A lot of problems could be dimished if we got rid of all the cookies. Connections are fast nowadays, so we actually don't need cookies.
    When visiting some paysites where you do netbusiness i.e. buying movies, office tools etc they ask you if you want to store a cookie on your puter so access and login is easier for you the next time you visit their site. What happens is: You store a cookie on your puter that contains the username and password for that site - and other probable information like telephone #, postal address etc.
    IF ... if somebody gets access to your computer via trojan horses it would only be a small inconvenience for them to find out where you visit, usernames and passwords. This could be one means to hack an uo account - because a LOT of people HAVE backdoors on their computers without knowing it. They are not always activated because of a strong firewall.
    But the weaker machines could be in the hands of the culprits and since some that play UO probably also have trojans i think mayhaps we are closing in on the problem.
    I am not skilled enough to actually prove it, but i have had the suspicion for many years that a backdoor can be created via a cookie.

    I have enough information about the snmp.exe. I have stopped it from running in the taskmanager, i have banned all incoming and outgoing transmission to the file.

    But if i wouldn't have gotten the necessary information - the time you spend on posting the information is valuable anyway - also for other users. Thanks for your consideration.

    Wish more users could take the matter more seriously and some stratics boards posters likewise.

    BUT here comes the intr'sting part ... I scanned all my files and folders to see if i had anything left over from previous processes relating to uniblue.

    I had in the beginning of 2007 been forced to find the best virusscanners and firewalls since a stepdaughter by accident managed to download spyware. Not malware, but i don't want anything running in the system i haven't asked for.

    I can see now that i had remnants from uniblue (a trial software) that later was uninstalled (i manually delete remnants in the registry - since they slow down a computer), but i forgot to delete these remnants.
    The stored remnants from uniblue, the one minute to their site and the received spam offer confirms that they have been able to detect that MY particular computer have been visiting their site. By the way i have a dynamic IP.
    These remnants were obviously enough for them to detect that i have been visiting their site.
    Makes one think - right ?

    I have a request: If you can allow the following i'll post the names of three software tools that protects and cleans my computer to the extend that i feel secure.
    A firewall/virusscanner/spamfilter, a virusscanner and a registrytool.
    They are extremely safe and user friendly, and the last is a freeware.

    It could be seen as an advertizing, but my experience with these particular three tools has been beyond any expectation, and they all keep my machine on a virginal level every time i start up.

    I'll wait until i get a green go posting the names and links - otherwise people can write me private messages and get the names and links.

    I have tested MANY, because no program can get it all - but these three is top level.

    Thanks again for your back up.
     
  31. Guest

    Guest Guest

    No problem, spyware, malwares, and such things all play a part in online security and can be open doors for worse things!

    As for the programs for such, we welcome user's opinions, although we would prefer to read the names in Private Message so we can have a look ourselves just to make sure. As long as it is a good legit program, there shouldn't be any problems. We try to review references to programs and such.


    Personally: SpywareInfo Website (http://www.spywareinfo.com/) is a top place for loads of helpful information pertaining to removal of spyware, malware, adware, and other bad things.
    Knowledge is the best protection.
     
  32. wicker

    wicker Guest

    Dont assume that since you payed EA 30 bucks to do account tarnsfers for an account you are selling that your information is protected. I sold 2 accounts 9 months ago tht went thur the EA transfer system and EA is now billing but me and the account buyer for the same account. They still show both our information in their system for those accounts. I have no idea how to sell an account safley sin EA cant even do it!
     
  33. Highball

    Highball Guest

    I want to post this since there's a paragraph in an article/security review that relates to the UO hacking problem.
    I got the following review from my scanner provider and it made me think deeper about the hacking issue:

    &gt; Review:

    Computer security review 2007

    2007 was first and foremost the year of the Storm Worm, as described in a separate XXX (providers name) newsletter story. But apart from this notorious Trojan that infected between 15 and 50 million PCs during the year, 2007 also raised a lot of other computer security issues.

    Sweden's largest bank, XXX, announced in January that it had suffered the biggest Internet fraud in history. Over 8 million kronor ($1,2m) had disappeared in three months as a result of tailor-made trojans launched by Russian criminals and more than 250 customers became victims.

    In February, hackers briefly overwhelmed at least three of the 13 computers that help manage global computer traffic in one of the most significant hacking attacks since 2002, and in March American retailer XXX admitted that hackers had stolen credit and debit card details belonging to over 45 million customers in an attack on the company's computer systems.

    In November, the NATO countries finalised the organisation's first policy covering cyber attacks on member states' critical national infrastructure after hacking campaigns against Estonia in May, and Whitehall and the Pentagon in October.

    The year also saw a sharp increase in the use by criminals of non-operating-system exploits. Common desktop applications such as Adobe Reader, Apple Quicktime, and Real Player became favorite targets of criminal hackers, while other Web attacks focused on the increased use of social networking sites like Facebook and MySpace.

    Attackers also focused on instant messaging (my remark: Such as msn, icq). According to experts, in 2007 there were 10 high-severity instant messaging risks, compared to none in 2006.

    <font color="red">Online gaming</font> was another common target for attacks as virtual objects in games gained in value. According to experts, the number of password-stealing Trojans that <font color="red">targeted online games in 2007 grew faster than the number of Trojans that targeted banks</font>. This was supported by the news of a Dutch 17-year-old who became the first European being arrested for stealing virtual objects after stealing virtual property from the 3D cartoon world Habbo Hotel.

    Microsoft released 69 security bulletins in 2007, nine fewer than 2006's total but 14 more than in 2005.

    &gt;

    It looks like we all are up against maybe incoming organized crime. Some might laugh and some might be smart and listen.

    I have many times thought about the hackers ... [pathetic gamers] ! Are they really so greedy that that want each and every item in the game ?
    When do they have ENOUGH ?

    Now it actually seems that at least some part of the <font color="red">hacking /stealing accounts and threats against players to pay (otherwise an account is deleted)</font> is part of a serious business where a much more sinister part of black marketeers have found a way to make real life money.

    After reading the review, after the review confirming a suspicion i've had and the degree to what has taken place, i don't find them pathetic players anymore.
    I find them dangerous to OU's existence. I actually hope i am wrong and my judgement is WAY OFF !

    I can't blame a person that has an account hacked, and got no back up or aid from UO, that they leave the game.
    And if sufficient gamers do that, it won't pay off for EA to uphold the game.
    Question is: Have we seen the peek of that activity, or has this just started ?

    I have often thought when i heard a guild member luring another member into downloading and installing something: Pathetic and disloyal.

    Well, who says an outside hackers purpose is other than, simply to join a guild and to lure members into such activity? That outsider has obviously no loyalty to the guild <font color="red">(sole purpose is to hack accounts).</font>
    Some might be greedy gamers, BUT ... some might actually be involved in such organized activities.

    <font color="green">How do they dot it and how can't we prevent them from succeding ?</font>

    Well we can't protect ourselves 100 %. The harder WE try, the more WE defend ourselves - the cleverer THEY become.

    <font color="blue">1.</font> First of all ... they have a TRUE twisted and skilled mentality in how to deal with the human mind - the luring process. There's a REASON for the term: <font color="red"> con ARTIST</font>

    <font color="blue">2.</font> Luring people into websites has it's own purpose since by visiting websites - other than UO official and approved - there's a GREAT risk that malware will be installed on our computers.
    If you think they just have simple sites that look like cheap and fast created garbage - REthink: They spend a LOT of time setting up professional, graphical as well as beautiful texted, websites to give the impression that visiting is safe since ... "ah this site is very beautiful, no twisted minds can create such beauty" (we instinctively think). Be certain that they DO !

    <font color="blue">3.</font> They plan carefully. Yes, later the business is fast money and MAY look like panic hacking or panic scams (amateurish), but the planning has been careful:
    A character sets up an account. They give the impression that they are newcomers (which some might be - there's a REASON for the term: <font color="red"> con ARTIST</font>), but in the long run they enter a guild and find out who in that guild is naive and can be a subject for a sweet talked lure to install something obviously innocent.

    "Hey i need a favor from you, i have this idea for our guild. If i mail it to you - can you give your honest opinion about it ?". (Could be a simple text file - even a picture - with an implemented virus. Opened ... it's a BINGO !)
    Or pursuasion to download and install something from a website - it's more likely a bingo.

    They can however also expand their activities to solo players or no guilded players: They make friendships, they invite you to their houses. You are friended to their house - h.e.c.k you might even be CO-OWNED !!! Your mind doesn't even CONSIDER the fact that this has a hidden purpose. They are able to <font color="red">"guide"</font> your thoughts away from suspicion.

    <font color="blue">4.</font> You think: [Yes, you're right to some degree - but we don't think it's planned and organized. It's simply players that have gone beyond legal boundaries.]
    Well it might so far "only" be pathetic players, but be wised: If an account can be stolen and sold for 100 to 200 US$ - be certain that one day the professionals WILL find their way into that business niche. Just 100 accounts sold on the net, well they have had a good days income).

    <font color="blue">5.</font> Selling stolen items from another account: It seems that this is a safer way to get an income, since stolen items can't be traced. Sufficient items being sold patiently ... well in the long run it will make money. When draining an account of sellable items ... they just put them on the net. After a while when enough accounts have been drained, it means a safe and steady income. It's a safe increase.

    They also might sell them ingame and have a HUGE Britannian GP income. Later they sell the Gold pieces on the net in real money. The term: Money laundry !

    <font color="blue">6.</font> Buying duped items. It maybe is not subject to account stealing, but again turning the game into real life money, helps these characters. And if EA catch you with a duped item ... Guess who's account is closed and banned forever !


    &gt; As i wrote earlier ... ways to prevent malware or lures:

    Since there's a great deal of real life money involved, it might pay off to steal an account, sell it or transfer the items.

    <font color="blue">I.</font> One way to deal with account selling is, we stop all real life money involvement. It might not stop pathetic in gamers, but NO professional criminals spend time on NO real life income !!!

    <font color="blue">II.</font> One way to deal with disloyal guild members: No matter WHAT they promise you, no matter WHAT sweet talk they can achieve - do NOT download, do NOT follow their instructions about no UO approved websites.

    <font color="blue">III.</font> Do NOT inform others - no matter WHAT they say, ask or instruct you to: About your account name, account password, personal info, your IP address or any I-net related information about your computer !!!!!!!!!!

    <font color="blue">IV.</font> Read the prime post very carefully, as it has some great advices, and then follow them.

    &gt;

    If all this seems fantastic and way off imagination ? Well, it could wear off, but it CAN also increase in activity.

    Some laugh to a degree of degradation about "way off" imagination, but mockers often than others find themselves in the situations they were warned about. Because they naively think: "this won't happen to me", "nobody is THAT skilled" - "i am smarter than they are" (really think so ?) and then they don't take precautions.

    I am not in any way the type that says: "Well i told you" or "I warned you". It's entirely up to you to follow the instructions or advices given in the post.

    I can tell you this though: I have never had malware even close to being installed on any computer i have had. I have had computer since 1980, and only once was i close to malware: I received an e-mail with some standard text from a friend and an attachment - Pretty Park. The text made me suspicious, since there was no reason for her to send such a text. The attachment wasn't being asked for and therefore wasn't opened or even looked at.
    BINGO ... a couple of days later she wrote and warned that her mailbox had auto mailed an e-mail with an attachment (guess what the name was) to all in her addressbook.

    You might argue: It never happened to you, so why set up so strict precautions? I might argue: COULD one reason that it never happened be: That i actually HAVE prevented the events ... by BEING so precautious ??? Think about that.

    The final advice, and here you better listen to an ol' timer life experiencer:

    <font color="blue">V.</font>Use your imagination - even way off or in the extremes:
    <font color="red">"EVERYthing that a human is capable of ... HAS been done, IS done or WILL BE done"</font> &gt; only THEN can you prepare yourself.
     
  34. sorner

    sorner Guest

  35. Highball

    Highball Guest

    Yes i know ...

    It's a struggle and a battle for both parties: The vendors and the malicious.

    It's like a manufacturor of safe's: They don't give a guarantee against instrusions or break thru into a safe - they only guarantee how long it minimum takes to break thru and open a safe.

    A pityful and pathetic world we live in.

    Next time, do us all a favor. Don't post any hyperlinks, copy and paste the article itself.

    One never knows if the visited website is infected.

    But good and wise article.
     
  36. Highball

    Highball Guest

    The online gaming market is vast, and of course this has not gone unnoticed by cybercriminals. Games like World of Warcraft (the number of WoW subscribers surpassed 9 million in July 2007), Lineage 2, Second Life, Ultima online and Everquest have millions and millions of users, so games like these have become a major target for fraud in recent years.

    Hackers use malicious programs to steal players account information and then sell virtual items, such as gold or weapons, for real world cash. Research from 2007 showed that the raw value of a WoW account was higher than a credit card and its associated verification data. One card can be sold for up to $6, but a WoW account will be worth at least $10.

    An account that has several high level characters associated with it could be worth far more and some players accounts can be worth up to $10,000. Some estimates have put an $800m price tag on the global market in game items and cash.

    According to a report from September 2007, three main methods are used by cybercriminals to swipe online game passwords: social engineering, exploiting game server vulnerabilities, and using malicious programs to obtain passwords.

    <font color="red">Ways to spread malicious programs include publishing links which claim to be game patches on player message boards, sending e-mail or in-game spam presented as a game patches, and exploiting browser vulnerabilities when a user visits a game-related Web site.</font>

    Virus writers at first used classic key loggers to steal passwords for online games, a tactic that can be traced back to 1997. Today, attacks have become much more sophisticated. When the most recent Trojans detect the launch of an online game, they intercept the password entered via the keyboard, send this data to the malicious user's email address, and then self-delete. The malware can lie dormant on a victim's machine for months or years until they run a specific game.

    The number of malicious programs targeting online game passwords has exploded. In 2002 such malware was almost non-existant but in 2006 the number exceeded 16,000. More than 90 percent of all Trojans targeting online games are written in China, and 90 percent of the passwords stolen by these malware agents belong to players on South Korean sites.
    More than 40 percent of all Trojans for MMORPG (Massively Multi-player Online Role-Playing Game) games target Lineage 2, with World of Warcraft (20 percent) the second most popular target. Other online games coveted by hackers include Gamania, Tibia and Legend of Mir. Each accounts for about six percent of password-stealing Trojans.
     
  37. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I found this while browsing the UO website. I don't recall ever seeing it before. There is a ton of information about computer security:

    http://support.uo.com/faq_1.html
     
  38. Highball

    Highball Guest

    Hmm. It seems that UO finally take the hacking seriously since it may have burdened their responses to the events.

    At least they now respond with some pro et contra methods - this is new, and mayhaps they finally do care now.

    Good link !
     
  39. Llewen

    Llewen Grand Inquisitor
    Professional Stratics Veteran Stratics Legend Campaign Supporter

    Joined:
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    I'll repost here what I've posted elsewhere.

    After reading several posts from people said they have had their game accounts hacked for Ultima Online, and knowing that several of us have had problems with viruses and spyware, I thought I'd put together a thread on security best practises.

    1. Keep your software up to date. This is probably the single most important piece of advice you will read here. Stay on top of updates, and as much as possible, keep everything up to date. Here is a quick list of things you will want to keep up to date.

    - Hardware drivers. This might not be immediately obvious, but even hardware drivers can have security vulnerabilities. At the very least you will want to keep your drivers up to date to keep your system as stable as possible. For newer hardware, and especially video drivers, you should be checking for updates once a month. For older hardware, or hardware other than video drivers, you should be checking once every three months or so. If the software that comes with your hardware has automatic update features, use it, but don't rely on this for hardware. I have had the problem with Logitech specifically that the automatic updates didn't tell me a new version of my software had been released, so check manually at least once every three months.

    Here is a quick list of drivers that you should be keeping up to date:

    Chipset Drivers (for your motherboard)
    Video Drivers
    Sound Drivers
    Ethernet Adaptor Drivers (for your lan card or nic)
    Keyboard and Mouse Drivers

    - Your operating system. No matter what operating system you are running, keep your operating system up to date. Any operating system released in the past few years should have a way of automatically keeping up to date. Use the feature for whatever operating system you are running and if it is on a schedule, make sure it is scheduled for a time when your computer will actually be on. You should be checking for updates at least once a week.

    If you are using an old operating system that is no longer supported, such as Windows 9x/Me, it is time to switch to something else. If money, or old hardware is an issue, there are plenty of great options for Linux, that are free, that will run on older hardware. If you don't feel up to reinstalling your operating system yourself, get someone to do it for you.

    - Web browser. If the web browser you use isn't updated with your operating system, make sure you keep it up to date. You really should be checking for updates to your web browser every day. Have it automatically check for updates every time you open up your browser. If you are using a really old browser, that is no longer being developed, stop using it and switch to a product that is actively being developed. There are plenty of free options for browsers that are actively being developed, there is no excuse for using an old browser. If you are comfortable with your old browser, and don't want to switch, get over it. Nothing can get you in trouble faster, and more easily, than security vulnerabilities in your web browser and any old web browser that is no longer being developed will have security vulnerabilities.

    - Chat and email applications. If your email and chat aren't included in your operating system updates, make sure you keep them up to date. Again, most newer applications will have a way of keeping up to date automatically, enable those features, and if they are enabled, make sure your computer will be on at the times your update checks are scheduled to run.

    - Security software. If you are using security software, which you absolutely should be. Make sure you keep it up to date. Use scheduled updates if they are available. Anti-virus software with the virus definitions should be updated daily. Other security software such as anti-spyware software should be updated at least once a week.

    - Java. Keep your Java up to date. Once again, with Sun Java, on Windows, there are options for automatic updates, use them.

    - Office software. Keep your word processor, spreadsheet software, etc., as up to date as possible. If it is newer, you should be checking once a month at least. If it is older, and no longer being updated, it might be time to consider switching to something newer. If money is an issue, or old hardware, OpenOffice is a top notch product, that is free, and should operate well on any system purchased in the past six years, and maybe even older systems than that. It is available for most of the major operating systems.

    - Games. This isn't always possible to do, as many of us play older games that are no longer being developed, but as much as possible, keep them up to date. Any games you can play online should have automatic updates, or update notification available. If you have a game that can be played online that is no longer supported, you should consider no longer playing it online, or if you must, play it only with trusted friends, or on a lan.

    2. Consider switching to a more secure operating system. If all you aren't running software that you can't do without, that won't run on Linux, you should consider switching to Linux. It is far more secure than Windows, for many reasons (I don't know about Macs). If all you are doing is basic computer "stuff", such as playing browser based games, email, chat, office software and graphics software, Linux can do all of those things, and your chances of being hacked or infected with a virus, even if you don't know what you are doing, are almost 0.

    3. Switch to a safer browser. Stop using Internet Explorer, now. There is no good reason to use Internet explorer for anything other than updating Windows, and the few programs that require Internet Explorer to view content. Get Firefox and install the NoScript and Adblock Plus addons. There are millions of unsafe sites out there, and many unscrupulous advertisers would love to spy on you, and far worse. Don't argue about it, just do it. It may be a bit annoying until you get used to it, but a site operated by criminals can steal any confidential information you may have on your computer, from game account names and passwords, to credit card numbers and banking information, and all it takes is one click.

    There are sites that do depend on advertising to pay for their operating costs. If you frequent such a site, and you trust them and their advertisers, simply disable Adblock for that site. However, sometimes perfectly legitimate sites can be hosting advertising for clients that are not to be trusted, without being aware that this is the case. So be careful with that, even on sites that you trust.

    4. Always have your cookies on prompt, and make it your default habit not to accept them. If you find you need them, for example to access forums, or use a banking service, or shop online, simply remove the site from your list of blocked sites, reload the page, and accept the cookies. Never accept any cookie from any site unless you are certain you can trust the site, and make sure you check the domain name of any cookie before you accept it to make sure that it actually belongs to the site that you trust. Many advertisers will try to load "tracking cookies" and worse, on to your computer, so even though the site you are visiting may be trustworthy, they may be hosting advertising that is not as trustworthy as they are.

    To do this in Firefox go to Tools in the top menu, then choose Options. Then choose the Privacy tab, and in the "Keep until" drop down menu, select "ask me every time". Click on OK. It will look something like this:

    [​IMG]

    For Internet Explorer, do this even if it is not going to be your primary browser, select Tools from the top menu, Internet Options, choose the Privacy tab, then click on the Advanced button, then check the "Override automatic cookie handling" box, and choose the two "Prompt" options below that. Hit OK twice to get out of the options menus. It will look something like this:

    [​IMG]

    To remove a blocked site in Firefox, choose the Exceptions tab, find the site in the list, and choose Remove Site. In Internet Explorer choose Sites, find the site in the list, and choose Remove.

    5. Install antivirus software, and run a full scan at least once a week. As I stated above, make sure you use the automatic updates option and make sure it is updated at least once every day. I recommend avast. If you can afford it, buy the full version from them, they deserve the support. If you can't, the free version is fully functional and high quality. I have also found it more friendly to older systems. AVG is another popular free antivirus solution. I do not recommend Norton. The only virus I have ever had on my computer, was missed by a fully up-to-date Norton scan, and just about anything Norton makes these days is a resource pig.

    5. Install both Adaware and Spybot and run scans with both of them at least once a week. Make sure they are fully up to date before you run the scans. Spybot's Resident SDHelper and Teatimer are also excellent features and should be updated at least once a week (when you do your scan, right? ;) ).

    6. Never ever click on an email or chat link or attachment, unless you already know what the link or attachment is, and you are expecting it, even if the email or chat message comes from a friend. Also never allow anyone to add you to their contact list in chat, unless you know who they are, and you trust them.

    7. Finally, use a more secure chat client. There are better choices for chat clients than any of the big proprietary chat clients, such as ICQ, AOL, MSN etc. All of these "official" chat clients come with annoying advertising, and most of them come with security vulnerabilities. I highly recommend Trillian, but there are other free options as well. The best thing about Trillian is that it allows you to access all your chat accounts with one client. Again, if you can afford to buy the "Pro" version, do it, they deserve the support. If you can't, the basic version is fully functional, and includes no spyware or advertising whatsoever.

    Pidgin is another multi-protocol chat client that I highly recommend. Again, more secure and completely without any spyware or advertisements.

    8. Use complex passwords for any accounts you use the need passwords. Make them at least eight characters long, and use a combination of upper and lower case letters, numbers, and symbols, if they are allowed. "5tY9Lq02" is an example of a strong password. "bunnies" is an example of an extremely weak password.

    9. Never share account information such as names and passwords with anyone if at all possible, unless you completely trust that person, and are completely comfortable with losing everything in that account, including personal information. This includes friends and family. The majority of accounts that are hacked, are hacked by people that are known to the victim, either friends, or more often, family members. If you do share an account name and password with someone, make sure that you don't share that password with any other account.

    9. Use a firewall. For Windows XP and better there is an acceptable software firewall included with the operating system, make sure you use it. If you are running an older version of Windows, it is time to make the switch, either to Windows XP or Vista, or to Linux if your hardware can't handle XP or Vista. Linux comes with a firewall as part of the operating system, all you need to do is install a gui, such as GuardDog, to set it up.

    If at all possible also use a hardware firewall. If you only have one computer at home, and are connected to the internet directly through your modem, you shouldn't be. Go out and buy a router. You can find simple basic routers for $50 US or Canadian, or less. If at all possible get a wired router. If you must use a wireless router, make sure you secure it properly. An unsecured wireless network is like leaving your house completely unlocked with all your doors and windows wide open with a big sign on your lawn saying, "Please come in and help yourself, I won't mind!" and then going on a six month long vacation.
     
  40. Nok

    Nok Lore Master
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    Excellent post Llewen! And right on the mark.

    Coming up soon there is going to be a huge outbreak of hackings. A big DNS flaw is being worked to corrected by companies, ISPs and host providers... even while criminal hackers are already getting exploits out to attack DNS and users alike.

    People get your systems updated & protected... the race is on, and will it'll be an ugly one.

    News item - WARNING: DNS Storm Coming.
     
  41. Sarphus

    Sarphus Guest

    There should be something in this thread about how renting out vendor space in luna puts your account at high risk (extremely high liability for getting banned)
     
  42. Lucy of Kenton

    Lucy of Kenton Seasoned Veteran
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    similar to what i was going to say but i didnt have a luna vendor
    'how do we protect our accounts against ea'?
     
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